Big Mike's Trading Forum
 

Go Back   Big Mike's Trading Forum

> Trading Forums > Psychology and Money Management


Notices
     

Big Mike's day trading method and advice
Started:December 5th, 2009 (02:43 AM) by Big Mike Views / Replies:221,442 / 797
Last Reply:September 12th, 2013 (04:14 PM) Attachments:78

Welcome to Big Mike's Trading Forum.

Welcome, Guest!

This forum was established to help traders by openly sharing indicators, strategies, methods, trading journals and discussing the psychology of trading.

BMT is fundamentally different than most other trading forums:
  • We work extremely hard to keep things positive on our forums.
  • We do not tolerate rude behavior, trolling, or vendor advertising in posts.
  • We firmly believe in openness and encourage sharing. The holy grail is within you, it is not something tangible you can download.
  • We expect our members to participate and become a part of the community. Help yourself by helping others.


You'll need to register in order to view the content of the threads and start contributing to our community. It's free and simple, and we will never resell your private information.

-- Big Mike
     

Reply
 78  
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread

Big Mike's day trading method and advice

Old December 6th, 2009, 04:49 PM   #31 (permalink)
Elite Member
Sweden
 
Trading Experience: Master
Platform: TT, NT, MetaTrader
Broker/Data: Velocity Futures, MB Trading
Favorite Instrument: EUR/USD
 
George's Avatar
 
Posts: 393 since Jun 2009
Thanks: 988 given, 905 received


Big Mike View Post
From The Daily Trading Coach by Brett Steenbarger:



Subtle, but so incredibly useful. It made me realize I've been setting my goals based on reaching a certain profit for the day. Profit is something you cannot control! The only thing you can control is how well you trade, not whether or not you took money out of the market (and how much).

Now each morning, before I trade, I am going to literally take a moment and picture myself trading the entire day. Picture the before lunch moves, the after lunch moves. Picture myself executing exactly as laid out in my trading rules. And that will be the goal, to follow my rules as best as possible.

Mike

If you picture the before lunch moves, the after lunch moves. Then what you'll do is to simply project something that can get you in trouble if it's not unfolding the way you're picturing it.

Elite athleets do indeed picture the complete outcome of their performance before they actually execute it. But they also picture in advance all the errors they could be doing.

I would still go for the now part, meaning that you want to neutralize yourself enough in order to be able to translate all the action taking place in the now, and act according to what you perceive. So, the big difference here is between, projection and perception.

Try to do this instead. Picture yourself acting according to the book (in the best possible way), but picture yourself acting totally against your rules also, missing out, and trading badly.
Switch between the two, by going back and forth till you no longer feel any emotional charge to none of the pictures.

That ought to be putting you in a neutral state. And remember, you already know how to trade, and how to act. What you're aiming for is to get yourself in a neutral state. Normally we miss out and trade bad, not because we're being bad traders, or that we don't have enough rules, or bad strategies, but because of all the emotional charge going on in the background.

/George

Reply With Quote
     
The following 12 users say Thank You to George for this post:
     

Old December 6th, 2009, 08:26 PM   #32 (permalink)
Trading for Fun
Dallas TX/USA
 
Trading Experience: Intermediate
Platform: Multicharts
Broker/Data: AMP/CQG
Favorite Instrument: ES
 
Posts: 154 since Jun 2009
Thanks: 33 given, 265 received


Big Mike View Post
- To improve your own trading, consider taking on a student.

Very true. My personal trading has been really "on" since I started trying to show people my process.


Quoting 
I don't run a trading room (although I've thought about it), so it's not live trading calls "buy here, sell here" I am giving.

Because of the other stuff you've been saying in this thread, the "buy here, sell here" thing only works for a certain percentage of people anyway. I used to work in a trading room where we'd say "I'm in... NOW" and "I'm getting out... NOW." And even with the exact entry and exit yelled into a microphone, a startling number of people will watch you make money while they lose money. I think a lot of people just need to find their own path, and the best you can do is try to keep the focus on discipline and systematic effort. And get them off the grail quest! It's better to trade MA crossover skillfully than to trade the next big thing poorly.

Reply With Quote
     
The following 8 users say Thank You to Richard for this post:
     

Old December 7th, 2009, 01:24 AM   #33 (permalink)
Administrator: 'da Big Dawg
Manta, Ecuador
 
Trading Experience: Advanced
Platform: My own custom solution
Favorite Instrument: SP500, Stocks
 
Big Mike's Avatar
 
Posts: 31,137 since Jun 2009
Thanks: 20,735 given, 38,108 received


From The Daily Trading Coach by Brett Steenbarger:

- Your goal is not to eliminate or even minimize emotion. Rather, the challenge is to extract the information that may underlie those emotions.

- When you ignore feelings, you cannot have a feel for the markets.

This one stood out for me, because for months I have been telling myself to eliminate emotion out of the equation (such as, not taking a signal because I 'feel' a certain way). Specifically, I tried to eliminate times when I took two back to back stops and would not trade a third time simply because I felt like I shouldn't.

When I read what he said about "when you ignore your feelings, you cannot have a feel for the markets", it really hit home. It made sense. The light went off. So all this time I have been misdirecting my focus slightly.

Obviously, a traders intuition, his feel for the market, is of critical importance. My goal is not to turn myself into a robot, all my experience with automation makes that point unbelievably clear to me. Blindly taking a signal because a set of x,y,z values all happened at a precise time or setting simply does not work reliably over time.

You must have a broader sense of the market and be able to utilize that sense to know when your emotions are based on fear or anxiety. Sometimes fear is useful, but anxiety is not.

I want to talk specifically about the feelings traders get when they are in trades, and the actions they take based upon those feelings. We've all been there. In hindsight, you kick yourself for getting out too early, or kick yourself for staying in even when you just knew you should get out. This type of behavior and thinking is not doing you any favors! You can't win! There is never a right answer, never a positive outcome! You cannot allow yourself to think this way!

For instance, if you are in a position and it just doesn't "feel right", you should think about what is going on and what your options are:

- Do you ignore the feeling, and press on regardless? It seems every time I've done this it was a mistake. Something to the tune of "I'm not going to get out of this one! I'll show you!". This doesn't end well.

- Do you close the position instantly, because it doesn't "feel right" and that's all you need to know? I've tried this approach, and it does work better than the first one, but it really is not the solution.

- Do you go through a quick checklist and try to pinpoint why you're experiencing the apprehension? This is what I do, and what I believe works best. I quickly review my reasons for entering the trade, and see if I missed something valid. You have to be careful, you need to have a clear picture of what is valid and what isn't, but don't allow yourself to constantly use some sort of 'gotcha' that you missed at entry but later caught as an excuse why the trade went south.

I'd like to try to be specific. I have a saying that I tell my 'students' and friends. There are two things about every trade:

- You had better be able to clearly show me why you got in a trade.
- You had better be able to clearly show me why you got out of a trade.

By this, I mean that I expect screen shots and commentary on what you saw in the market that told you to take a position when you did, and more important, why you exited where you did.

Too many times I've heard a friend or student say "If I had only stayed in like I was supposed to, I could have got an extra 20 ticks!". Prove it. Do it! Just like starting a public journal will hold yourself accountable and improve your trading, so will knowing that you have to explain to your coach or friend why you did what you did. You want to look smart right? You want to look like your following your rules, right? It helps you trade better.

For me, I have a trading buddy that I share practically every single trade with, and he shares all of his with me. We sometimes spend an hour or more each day just talking about the trades we took. This is important! We do not have the same setups, but we both trade CL so we each share our own views and perspective on each others trades. My friend knows my rules, and I know his. We hold each other accountable.

So backing up a minute and bringing this all into perspective --- when I am in a trade, and I start to get apprehension about the trade going poorly, I quickly review my reasons for entry, I quickly ask myself if the trade is doing what I thought it would do, and I quickly imagine myself or visualize myself telling my friend about it and what his response would be. Those three things are enough to know if I should stay in, or get out. It's a good balance of both "fight" and "flight", in my opinion, to help you remain neutral and make a good balanced decision. Fight meaning staying in the trade so if it does run, your friend won't ask "why the heck did you get out?!?", and Flight meaning getting out of the trade and having good reason to do so, enough so that even if the trade does run, your friend will agree you did the right thing, and more importantly, you took either no loss or a very minor one.

In the end, you must remain positive. Your goal is to trade as well as possible. Be proud of yourself for following your plan, regardless of the outcome. The outcome is not the hard part! Once you master the discipline to trade well, the outcome will be very rewarding ($$).

Mike

Due to time constraints, please do not PM me if your question can be resolved or answered on the forum.

Need help?
1) Stop changing things. No new indicators, charts, or methods. Be consistent with what is in front of you first.
2) Start a journal and post to it daily with the trades you made to show your strengths and weaknesses.
3) Set goals for yourself to reach daily. Make them about how you trade, not how much money you make.
4) Accept responsibility for your actions. Stop looking elsewhere to explain away poor performance.
5) Where to start as a trader? Watch this webinar and read this thread for hundreds of questions and answers.
6)
Help using the forum? Watch this video to learn general tips on using the site.

If you want
to support our community, become an Elite Member.

Reply With Quote
     

Old December 7th, 2009, 07:16 AM   #34 (permalink)
Elite Member
Ireland
 
Trading Experience: Advanced
Platform: NinjaTrader
Broker/Data: IB and Kinetick
Favorite Instrument: ES
 
Shivaya's Avatar
 
Posts: 111 since Jun 2009
Thanks: 55 given, 358 received

Light the LIGHT

I almost agree Mike. I started trading stock index futures in 1985 and been trading ever since. Here is what I have learned. It may help someone out there.

I currently trade S&P500 emini fulltime. I trade because I love Being Free. I have no future goals, I just love trading in this moment. I have a well worked out trading plan, sound money management and love to see traders become free of the fear of the Money Lords!

At first I traded for the profits until I learned the real reason for my being in this business. To find a way to Free my consciousness of the darkness of fear. It is fear that controls us. It is fear that we focus on with real money. The Money Lords know we are afraid of the "feeling of fear" and not ironically losing money. We will let others trade and lose our money to avoid the 'feeling of fear'. I finally learned the cause. Absense of Light in my consciousness. Learning psychology of trading just added to the darkness of the fear, for I was focusing on the problem and getting still more fear.

So NOW I Focus on the beauty within and there is no fear! 'Single-Pointed-Concentration' in this Moment shines a Light on my free Inner Being. It is this that works for me.

Reach into your Inner Being and Let your Light Shine! In the eternal Forever Present Moment there is no fear. In that Light hearted state you just Love to Trade your well rehearsed and tested trading plan.

LOVE your trading and the way will LIGHTen up!

Reply With Quote
     

Old December 8th, 2009, 06:05 AM   #35 (permalink)
Administrator: 'da Big Dawg
Manta, Ecuador
 
Trading Experience: Advanced
Platform: My own custom solution
Favorite Instrument: SP500, Stocks
 
Big Mike's Avatar
 
Posts: 31,137 since Jun 2009
Thanks: 20,735 given, 38,108 received

Some more random thoughts of my own:

Why do some traders treat trading so lightly? Let me be specific. You wake up late, roll out of bed, and climb into your office chair. Probably still in your underwear, not showered, no breakfast, etc.

Then you put on a trade, and lose. Actually, the outcome of the trade is not important. Although I am willing to bet, you lose. What is important is why would you treat trading with such little respect?

Surely, with a "real" job, you would not be late, you would be properly showered, dressed, and know the importance of a meal prior to starting your work day.

With trading, it requires you to be at the absolute top of your game. Mentally and physically alike, you must prepare yourself to trade just like you prepare yourself for a "real" job. Surely you would agree that trading is very real, so it must be treated with the utmost respect.

Now let's picture the way it should be:
- Proper nights rest
- Wake up on time
- Shower, dress
- Nice breakfast

Now you've finally made it to the office chair and sat down. Now you prepare yourself to trade, which includes:
- Clear your mind of any preconceptions
- Focus on the specific task at hand
- See nothing but your chart. No email, no website
- Review your charts and make observations about what is happening right now in the market

Now comes the meditation part, which I hope you don't dismiss because it is really important, to me at least:
- Deep breath
- Close eyes, just sit for 60 seconds, breathing deeply
- Picture yourself trading today
- You are following your rules
- You are practicing patience
- You are happy with the outcome

Do not focus on the market heading higher or lower. Do not focus on pullbacks or price hitting a certain S/R. No, the objective is to picture yourself simply 'trading' the best you can, which means following your rules. Having done this very well, you are naturally pleased with yourself and thus happy with the outcome --- which is that you followed your rules. With time and practice, that will mean $$ as well.

It is very important to be at the top of your game. There is no room for anxiety, no room for second guessing yourself. There is no room for preconceived notions about if the market will head higher or lower. No. There is only the now, and you trading the now by following your trading plan.

Let me also say this since we are discussing a morning routine: I know many of you like to visit financial sites before trading. I have mixed feelings on this personally. If CNBC has a bunch of headlines saying negative news, you might be inclined to be bearish today. If you check economic calendars and a Crude Oil report comes out with better than expected figures, you might be bullish. In either case, you are letting an outside influence guide you instead of focusing on your chart and your trading plan.

Mike

Due to time constraints, please do not PM me if your question can be resolved or answered on the forum.

Need help?
1) Stop changing things. No new indicators, charts, or methods. Be consistent with what is in front of you first.
2) Start a journal and post to it daily with the trades you made to show your strengths and weaknesses.
3) Set goals for yourself to reach daily. Make them about how you trade, not how much money you make.
4) Accept responsibility for your actions. Stop looking elsewhere to explain away poor performance.
5) Where to start as a trader? Watch this webinar and read this thread for hundreds of questions and answers.
6)
Help using the forum? Watch this video to learn general tips on using the site.

If you want
to support our community, become an Elite Member.

Reply With Quote
     

Old December 8th, 2009, 08:38 AM   #36 (permalink)
Elite Member
Lagos, Nigeria
 
Trading Experience: Intermediate
Platform: NinjaTrader, SierraChart
Favorite Instrument: Euro Currency & Oil
 
lolu's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,320 since Jun 2009
Thanks: 896 given, 1,529 received


Big Mike View Post

Now comes the meditation part, which I hope you don't dismiss because it is really important, to me at least:
- Deep breath
- Close eyes, just sit for 60 seconds, breathing deeply
- Picture yourself trading today
- You are following your rules
- You are practicing patience
- You are happy with the outcome


Mike

Additions to the Meditation Part; which should be very important to every prospective professional and successful traders;

- Wake up at your normal Saturday morning wake-up time
- Eyes closed, just sit (preferably still lie in bed/no distractions from w...) for 5
minutes
- Picture your past week trading
i. Did you follow your plans and rules; if YES, Great !!!; if NO, note where you erred
ii. Did anything go wrong; if YES, note and consider corrective measures
iii. Did everything go right; if YES, note and consider consistency measures
- Getup and document your meditation session
- Do some exercise (walking, jogging, cycling, etc)

Lolu

Reply With Quote
     
The following 4 users say Thank You to lolu for this post:
     

Old December 8th, 2009, 01:31 PM   #37 (permalink)
Elite Member
Sydney, NS
 
Trading Experience: Intermediate
Platform: Ninja
Broker/Data: Zen-Fire
Favorite Instrument: TF,S,GC
 
cclsys's Avatar
 
Posts: 607 since Nov 2009
Thanks: 248 given, 348 received

"At the end of the day, all that you should focus on is how well you traded, not how much you made or lost."

It has taken me a long time to realise this for myself, even if I don't always follow that insight. But to me this is the key in terms of personal discipline: how well or poorly you follow your own rules/guidelines is far more important than the P/L statement. Obviously if you follow your rules impeccably and have 20 straight losing days, then the rules should be changed. But if you followed them impeccably, then you can analyse them carefully and devise better rules, whereas if you did not follow them impeccably, you have much less to work with statistically, but also mentally.

One tactic I put together recently - and which can continuously be revised - is to list entries hierarchically in terms of what works best so that if/when I am down for the day I only select entries that are higher probability and insist to myself that following the rules 100% at this point is the only acceptable behavior and if for any reason during a trade I impulsively over-ride the rules, then the final rule must be followed: stop trading that day.

Also in my journal before I started publishing here and adjusting to different format to make it easier to publish on the forum, I graded myself not on results but on the degree to which I was following my rules. This quickly revealed to me that working with exits after there is some profit in the position is my greatest weak area. Tha is an interesting one: it is not so hard to pull the trigger and enter; it is sometimes hard to keep the initial stop but I try not to enter a trade unless the default stop in the ATM makes sense market-wise and only needs to be adjusted by no more than 2 ticks more, and ideally is several ticks less.

So then the hard part is working with profits: take the money and run? Hold out for more and move to BE (which is then often hit); watch a small winner turn into a loser and hit a slightly tighter or the original stop? Or stubbornly hold out for the original PT even after market conditions seem to have changed. All that stuff is going on when one is sitting with a winning trade so where there is a pyschological sense of there being far more freedom to choose, more positive options to consider.

My main solution to this of late has been to move the stop to BE+1tick and then just hope that it keeps going. If it doesn't, at least there is little or no risk (net of slippage). But the problem with this is: three potential winners become BE trades and the fourth the stop is hit so I am down!

Thus for me the priority has become learning how to manage winning exits and that is mainly a psychological/emotional/discipline issue, not a technical or statistical one.

This is a good thread. (only half way through). Thanks.

Reply With Quote
     
The following 15 users say Thank You to cclsys for this post:
     

Old December 8th, 2009, 01:38 PM   #38 (permalink)
Elite Member
Sydney, NS
 
Trading Experience: Intermediate
Platform: Ninja
Broker/Data: Zen-Fire
Favorite Instrument: TF,S,GC
 
cclsys's Avatar
 
Posts: 607 since Nov 2009
Thanks: 248 given, 348 received

"If you are all worked up in a negative way (fear, anger, etc) then you will easily miss the opportunities presented before you each day. You must be ready to capitalize on every opportunity. At the end of the day, all that you should focus on is how well you traded, not how much you made or lost. Over time, you can adjust your rules for trading to ensure you are making money. The hard part is not creating the rules, its following them."

I stopped trading in mid-September partly because my data connection suddenly worsened, but also because of my worst ever losing day. On this day I had mentally prepared myself to stop exercising personal judgment (which I do alot) and just trade the rules 100%. I did. And was extremely unlucky in that there were about 7 losers in a row (which hardly ever happens). I simply had to give up because the DD was well over double my usual daily max loss limit. Of course as soon as I gave up, things turned around and I could have made it back, but frankly after that experience I needed to regroup and rethink my whole approach because I knew I would never have the confidence to trade those setups again with 'mechanical abandon', i.e. impeccable discipline.

Not sure what the lesson there was, but even though I did follow the rules well and most of the time those rules work, I definitely felt like a loser that day!

Reply With Quote
     
The following 6 users say Thank You to cclsys for this post:
     

Old December 8th, 2009, 02:01 PM   #39 (permalink)
Elite Member
Sydney, NS
 
Trading Experience: Intermediate
Platform: Ninja
Broker/Data: Zen-Fire
Favorite Instrument: TF,S,GC
 
cclsys's Avatar
 
Posts: 607 since Nov 2009
Thanks: 248 given, 348 received

I have a lot of background in meditation from the buddhist tradition even though nowadays I don't follow it as I used to. One technique that some here might consider is a 'before-you-go-to-sleep' technique to compliment Mike's excellent am routine recommendations (which involve far more than the meditation part of course).

Simply this: review your day, and not only in terms of trading but life in general; notice those things/events/actions etc. where you 'met your goals' (values) and those where you did not. In terms of trading, the same thing: review your behavior. For many of us, especially after a long day or active trading campaign many hours ago in the morning, we may not even remember all or perhaps any of the trades in detail. But we will be able to remember our overall state of mind, which includes how we prepared to trade (morning routines, dress, clean or messy desk, taking time, rushing, eating breakfast or not etc. etc.), how we set up the trading environment specifically (charts, journal etc.) and how we executed. Taking the time to review this every day - which just takes moments - can be very helpful, both for trading and life in general.

This way there is a preparation discipline, an execution discipline, and a review discipline. Each reinforces the other. Good before and after disciplined cultivate execution discipline as the meat of a 'sandwich', making each day a complete meal, as it were, or journey. In the Zen tradition, this is known as using experience as the path or journey or 'Do' in Japanese, often translated as 'way' but probably we would call it process or journey. Life becomes a learning journey, a 'do'. That is the goal and to the degree to which that is the case, one can ascribe positive or negative evaluations that are fundamentally meaningful versus simply 'whether or not I made money today'.

Reply With Quote
     
The following 5 users say Thank You to cclsys for this post:
     

Old December 8th, 2009, 03:02 PM   #40 (permalink)
Elite Member
Sweden
 
Trading Experience: Master
Platform: TT, NT, MetaTrader
Broker/Data: Velocity Futures, MB Trading
Favorite Instrument: EUR/USD
 
George's Avatar
 
Posts: 393 since Jun 2009
Thanks: 988 given, 905 received



Big Mike View Post



Surely, with a "real" job, you would not be late, you would be properly showered, dressed, and know the importance of a meal prior to starting your work day.



Mike

All of us contain within ourselves a great deal of, let's call it need for confirmation. When we go to a "normal" job, then we put at stake our exterior in order to get the needed confirmation from our close environment. We simply can't go to work without being showered, dressed, etc. Because then we'll be sending the "wrong" signals, and that would not lead us to the fulfilling of our needs.

I'm sure there are a lot of contradictory thoughts against this. And I don't want you to believe me, in fact I want you to prove me wrong. But remember all you need is to go inside and ask yourself if that is true indeed or not.

When it comes to trading. We still have this great need for confirmation. But the game is totally changed. The confirmation is coming from the outcome of your trades (from the market). If you by any chanse happen to take it to the contrary, meaning that you're not getting confirmed, then human nature is leading you to the lack of responsability towards yourself and you start to look for someone or something to blame.

That's normally when you start blaming the market. But the market is deaf, and doesn't give a s@t about you. You look around, and you find no one else to blame but yourself. By now, you're blaming your rules, the fact you haven't followed them. You start planing for the next day. You put even a greater presure on yourself "Tomorrow, I HAVE TO FOLLOW MY RULES".

And what happens if you don't follow them?!
Well, you change your strategy, you read another book, you go on looking for the ultimate indicator and so on. As soon as you've distanced yourself enough from the last bad experience you have. You go on again. By now you set up a whole new set of rules, you imply meditation, and some other stuff as well. (Please don't get me wrong, meditation and books are simply wonderful tools, and I respect them)

And it works for a while, til you're back in business. Now you start blaming yourself again. Does it sound familiar?! It's called the vicious "normal" cykle of a traders life!

You have to realize that all you've been doing all this time is nothing else then to feed whatever need you have. I took as an example the need for confirmation, because it's a very common need. And as long as you feed your need, IT IS NOT GOING TO DISAPPEAR!

A couple of years ago, I realized, that I always had the best trades, when I (pardon my language) DIDN'T GIVE A SHIT ABOUT THE OUTCOME!

The only problem was to duplicate that! Then (after a longer search) I realized, that what I was doing, each time I tried to duplicate that "feeling", "state of mind", was exactly this!

DON'T THINK OF A PINK ELEPHANT!

What did you picture? Exactly! That's another part of the problem, and it's the most common problem leading us to having difficulties, making several good trades in a row.
Later I realized, that it is about that "need" that we all have.

This is the part that requires the biggest challenge towards yourself though. First let me mention the most important aspect of all this.
In order to get rid of a need, you'll never do it by feeding it constantly. The way to get rid of it, is to find out what it is. It's like with fear. The best way to get rid of a fear, is by embracing it. That requires you to face it. When you've faced it, then it let's you out of its grip. The same thing happens with our needs. We have to find out what they are, and we have to face them.

Let me give you another example. About half way through my trading career I found out that you must love what you're doing. So I started to love trading (I loved it before too, but all the bad experience started to give me a bad taste), and I loved it, and I loved it even more. But I kept on loosing money. Why!?

Simply because, I was doing the "right" thing. Why am I sharing this? I just want you guys(and girls) to realize that the RIGHT thing is the thing that normally stinks most, and that you never dare to face. Why? Because that's the thing that will lead you to "DON'T GIVE A SHIT ABOUT THE OUTCOME", once you've got rid of it!

/George

Reply With Quote
     

Reply



Tags
1-2-3, 123, 2nd entry, 30 minute, 5 wave, 5m_chart, 6 range, 6b, 6e, 6r, 9.1, aapl, abc, accord, account, account size, accounts, accurate, adaptive, addiction, adp, advisor, adx, ai, al brooks, algo, algorithm, all_you_need, alpha, alternative, amazon, amp, analysis, angle, api, ari_kiev, artificial intelligence, ati, atm, ats, auction, auction market, audio, auto trading, auto-trading, automated, automated strategy, automated trading, automation, axis, back testing, backtest, bars, basic, bat, beat, beginner, behavioral, belize, bellafiore, benchmark, beta, better indicators, better volume, bid, big mike, birthday, bloomberg, bmt collectivema, bond, book, bot, bracket, breadth, breakout, breakouts, brett steenbarger, brett_stenbarger, broker, brokerage, brokers, bull market, business of trading, butterfly, c#, cable, calls, candle, candle patterns, cci, cd, ces, challenge, change, channel, charges, chart, chart patterns, chart style, chart trader, chart type, charting, charts, charttrader, china, choice, chop, christmas, cl, cl trading, climate, close, cma, cmi, cmi pivots, cnbc, code, coding, cog, collective, color, colors, combination, combine, commodities, commodity, comparison, condition, connection, consistency, contract size, contracts, control, convert, corn, corporate, correlation, costa rica, costs, cot, cot report, courses, crash, create, credit, crossovers, crowd, crude, crude oil, crude_oil_futures, cumulative delta, currency, custom, cycle, daily, daily range, data, data series, data source, dax, day, day trade, day trading, daytrading, day_trading, delta, demand, demo, derivative, desktop, development, diary, direction, discipline, discretionary, doc, dog, dollar, dom, double bottom, double top, dow, downloads, dragon, drawdown, dtn, dynamite, e-mini, easylanguage, ebooks, ecb, ecn, edge, education, educational, efuturevision, el, elite, ema, emini, emotions, employment, enter, entry, envelope, equilibrium, equity, equity curve, error, errors, es, etf, eu, euro, european, evaluation, event, excel, exchange, execution, exit, expansion, extend, extension, favourite, fdax, fear, fed, feed, feeds, fibonacci, file, fill, filled, filter, filters, fin-alg, fix, flag, flow, fold, footprints, forex, forex account, format, formula, forward testing, free, freedom, function, functions, funds, future, futurepath, futures, fx, ga, gambling, gap, gaps, gartley, gauge, gc, globex, goals, gold, gom, gp, greater than, group, guide, guru, habits, head and shoulders, hedge, hideout, high, histogram, historical, historical data, hold, holiday, holy grail, holy_grail, homework, horizontal, hotkeys, how to, how to make money, how to trade, how-to, improvement, in the zone, index, index futures, indexes, india, indicator, indicators, inflation, insanity, instance, instrument, instruments, interest, interest rate, interval, intraday, introduction, intuitive, investor rt, jobs, journal, journaling, journey, kindle, l2st, ladder, language, large account, learn, learning, left brain, level, leverage, life, limit, limit order, limit orders, line, liquidity, list, live, live trading, living, load, loop, lot, love, low, mae, make money trading, management, manual, margin, mark douglas, market, market data, market delta, market order, market profile, mark_whistler, master, mastery, materials, math, matrix, matt davio, maximize, mc, median, meeting, mental, mentor, mentoring, method, methodology, metrics, mfe, microsoft, middle east, mind, mirus, mirus_futures, ml, mode, modify, money management, money_management, motorcycle, moves, movie, moving average, mp, mtf, multi charts, multiple, multiple time frames, multiple timeframes, murrey_math_lines, music, naked, names, need help, network, new high, new indicator, newbie, news, ninja, ninja indicators, ninjatrader, nlp, not set, note, nt, nt optimization, nt7, nt7beta, nyse, object, oil, open, option, options, order, order flow, order management, orderflow, orders, overnight session, p/l, package, paid, pair, paper, paradise, parallel, parameter, parameters, pardo, partner, pat, pattern, patterns, peace, percent, perception, performance, period, perry, personal, phone, photon, photontrader, physical, pivot, pivot lines, pivot points, pivots, plan, platform, platforms, plot, poker, position size, position sizing, position trading, positions, practice, prediction, price, price action, price zones, price_action, prizes, profile, profit, profit taking, profit target, profitable, program, program trading, programmer, project, projection, proprietary, psyche, psychology, pullbacks, pulling the trigger, purpose, puts, pyramid, quant, question, questions, range, range bars, range chart, ray, real time, recognition, recording, reduce risk, reliability, reliable, replay, research, resistance, restore, retire, retracement, retracements, reverse, review, right brain, risk, risk management, risk/reward, ross_hook, ruin, rules, runner, russell, sample, save, sc, scale in, scalp, scalper, scan, screen capture, script, scripts, searching, self control, sentiment, series, session, settings, setup, sf, shark, sharpe, short term, signal, signals, sim, sim trading, simple, sim_trading, sine wave, skype, slippage, sma, small, smb, smb capital, software, sound, sp, spectrum, speed, spike, spiral, split, spreads, spreadsheets, squeeze, start, statistical, statistical analysis, statistics, steenbarger, stock index futures, stock market, stocks, stop, stop limit, stop loss, stopp, stops, strategy, strategy development, strength, stress, string, studies, supply, supply and demand, support, support and resistance, support_and_resistance, survey, swing, swing trading, syndrome, system, systematic, systematic trading, systems, t3, ta, tape, targets, technical, techniques, template, terms, testing, tf, thank you, tharp, thinkorswim, tick, tick chart, ticks, time, time frames, time series, timeframe, tor, tos, tpo, trade, trade journal, trade management, trade setups, trade station, trader, traders, trades, trading, trading buddies, trading buddy, trading futures, trading in the zone, trading journal, trading method, trading plan, trading psychology, trading room, trading strategy, trading system, trailing, trailing stop, trailing stops, training, transformation, translate, transparent, travel, trend, trend following, trend line, trend trading, trin, tv, type, uk, united states, universal, update, us markets, value area, values, video, virtual, vision, volatility, volume, webinars, wicks, will power, win rate, wolfe wave, workspace, ym, zenfire, zone
     

Big Mike's Trading Forum > Trading Forums > Psychology and Money Management > Big Mike's day trading method and advice

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Advice on Trading 6e and 6a for newbie grego Forex and Currency Trading 10 January 3rd, 2012 08:43 AM
Big Mike's Best of Trading 2010 Big Mike Feedback and Announcements 82 November 3rd, 2011 10:53 PM
My Journey to Produce High Quality Videos on Big Mike's Trading Forum HowardCohodas Tech Support 0 June 12th, 2011 07:04 PM
Advice on Trading Methods tderrick Traders Hideout 2 October 1st, 2010 03:36 PM
Enter to win: Free Elite Membership to Big Mike Trading Big Mike Feedback and Announcements 30 June 29th, 2010 07:56 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:26 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright © 2014 by Big Mike Trading. All information is for educational use only and is not investment advice.
There is a substantial risk of loss in trading commodity futures, stocks, options and foreign exchange products. Past performance is not indicative of future results.
 
no new posts

Page generated 2014-04-21 in 0.24 seconds with 20 queries on atlantis via your IP 54.242.85.89